Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Calling for Submissions #IWSG


Today I'm thrilled to announce the next big IWSG guide calling for submissions. Please read the guidelines below.

Guidelines:

The IWSG Guide to Writing for Profit--This will be a non-fiction book like our Guide to Publishing and Beyond.

What to write: Share experiences about making a profit as an author, what it takes to become a successful writer, the many skills a writer needs to learn other than writing, share the experience going from hobby writer to published author (without making it a self-promotion piece), the fallacies behind writing for profit, the little known facts learned along the way, what you wished you knew when you first started writing, or marketing tips based on experience of what has worked and what hasn't. Please include a title, your name, and a link to one of your sites. Send as an attached Word file or pasted into the email.

If you have any questions, email us at admin AT insecurewriterssupportgroup.com

Word limit: 500-1000 words.

Submission eligibility: All members of the IWSG Blog Hop, IWSG Facebook group and/or members of our IWSG Goodreads Book Club. It's free to join any of these groups and a great benefit to be a part of these communities.

Deadline: July 31, 2017

Send your submission to admin AT insecurewriterssupportgroup.com as an attached Word document and note which IWSG group you belong to. Please include your name, a one line bio, and one website link.

The one hundred best entries will be included in the book.

--
June's optional question is: Did you ever say “I quit”? If so, what happened to make you come back to writing?

I did quit writing for a long time. Silliest thing I ever did. It was the love of story and words that brought me back. But having taken that massive break, I found it really difficult to get back to the same skill level and ease of writing I had before I quit. But what is just as damaging is quitting reading. It can easily happen when you get busy and decide to sacrifice reading time so you have time to write instead. Big mistake! It has the same effect on writing as if I'd quit writing. So I recommend all writers make the time to read as well as write.

How about you? Did you ever quit? What brought you back? 

72 comments:

  1. Marketing is my bag, but I haven't published anything yet, so I'm not sure I'm a good candidate for contributions.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think someone who hasn't been published yet still has a lot to offer the anthology.

      Delete
    2. Thanks, Lynda:) I'll try to think up a brilliant topic. :)

      Delete
  2. I just wrote my own blog post about this (leenasbooks.com). I also had a long pause in writing because of my studies, but the writing flowed easily when I started anew. (Illnesses and death in the family, studies... all these took my energies).

    But one thing I really have had to learn to do again is to read. When I studied Egyptology for five years (and had a full time job at the same time) I had no time to read novels. Now I have decided to read at least a little every day and it has been so enjoyable!

    And as a writer, I think there is truth in what Stephen King said: "If you don't have time to read, you don't have time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that."

    Leena :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Reading is essential to a writer's life.

      Delete
  3. It's easy to forego one or the other - but really hard to pick back up again.
    Stoked for this anthology! You picked a great theme.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I agree Linda. It is hard to get back to the writing flow. I did quit as a teen and didn't get back to it until my son was born, so almost 15 years! I don't think I'll ever do that again. Happy Wednesday!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I wrote into my twenties and then quit for ten years. Once I started again, I couldn't stop.

    Do you know, I've never seen Lilo and Stitch?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha, we had a similar path.

      You may not have seen Lilo and Stitch, but you recognized Stitch! :)

      Delete
  6. I totally agree, if you take a writing break, never quit reading!

    ReplyDelete
  7. The backbone of writing is reading and not reading is like having a car without gas in it. We need to read. It is a necessity if we want to write well.
    Shalom aleichem,
    Patricia
    Everything Must Change

    ReplyDelete
  8. "But what is just as damaging is quitting reading." Absolutely! Stephen King says that if you don't have the time to read, then you don't have the time or the skill to write. I constantly have to remind myself of that when I set up my to-do list for the week and want to scrap reading time because it'll eat away at writing time. It's all a balancing act, isn't it?

    ReplyDelete
  9. I don't know that I've quit, but I sure have taken some long breaks :-)

    ReplyDelete
  10. I have a brain of a mule, which means I don't really quit since I see quitting as a defeat and we just can't have those. Outside the professional world, I do sometimes feel like quitting from people... like all people :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. I went through a reading crisis when my husband died when I couldn't read hardly any books. It was horrible. Glad I got out of that. I love writing, but just writing differently now--nonfiction--because I get paid for it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep, I recently let stress convince me I had no time for reading, or just couldn't read. It turns out that reading reduces stress.

      Delete
  12. Reading is as important as writing! My Kindle is overloaded with books. Sometimes I'm surprised at how many books I read a week:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's one thing I wish: that I was a faster reader because there are so many books I want to read!

      Delete
  13. It's the same with all skills isn't it? If we don't continue to practice, we lose the edge. So pleased you are back in the game, Lynda :) Take good care.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So true about that edge and the need to practice.

      Delete
  14. Excellent point about what happens when you quit reading. I'm pretty sure I could never do that - reading and writing keep me sane (relatively speaking, of course!) :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Same here. I've learned that sanity is somewhat important too ;)

      Delete
  15. Silliest thing for sure. Glad you realized it. =)

    The anthology sounds like an amazing one and I can't wait to see what comes of it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope you are able to take part in the anthology

      Delete
  16. I've never quit, but it always takes me a little time to get into the rhythm of a new project.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep, once that rhythm gets going, it's so much easier! And a whole lot more fun too.

      Delete
  17. Funny. Even after a couple days, I have that same moment. Will I be able to write another word? I wait and slowly the words come again. Every time is scares me. :-)

    Anna from elements of emaginette

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's good to be scared. Keeps you on your toes.

      Delete
  18. Yep, can't always be either or, you sure need both at your sure.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Shore* can't spell, what the heck

      Delete
    2. Hey, both makes sense... kinda. Or is that cents? Giggle.

      Delete
  19. Hi Lynda - that'll be a great read ... and wonderful to hear more about everyone's entries ... cheers Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm hoping it will help a lot of people.

      Delete
  20. I used to write a ton of non-fiction as a journalist, so for a while I had no creative energy left for writing fiction. But I never really quit...every day, I carried the guilt about not pursuing my dream. Finally I did something about it.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Very cool:) I'm interested. The though part will be keeping it under 1,000 words.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Sounds like a great idea for an anthology! As for quitting, haven't wanted to, but often take breaks to balance stress and real life. Reflecting and assessing more as I get older too. Approaching my writing more prayerfully and purposefully.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Absolutely, those breaks are sometimes necessary. And prayers are powerful, so it's a good approach.

      Delete
  23. Great idea for the anthology! And, yes! The quality of my writing definitely dwindles when I stop reading and/or writing. Great advice to keep at it.

    www.jessicatherrien.com

    ReplyDelete
  24. In a lot of these posts it seems that the love of telling a story is what brings people back. It's addictive!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not sure what it is about story that keeps us coming back. I should think about it some more...

      Delete
  25. First, I appreciate your comment that unpublished authors have something to contribute to the anthology. I had dismissed the idea of contributing, but am now inspired to rethink this. Second, I agree completely that not making time to read is damaging to our craft. To that end, several months ago I added it to my list of goals to read a certain amount each month. Knowing that I hold myself accountable to the goal encourages me to keep on track.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm so glad to hear you are thinking of contributing to the anthology.

      I joined the Goodreads reading challenge late in the year because I hadn't read enough. I'm currently seven books behind my goal, but I'm sure I will catch up. And I've certainly enjoyed the difference it has made to my writing.

      Delete
  26. Writing for profit? BWAHAHAHAHAHA!

    Trust me, you don't want any of my suggestions on that topic. :-P

    IWSG June

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. lol, you made me smile with your response. Perhaps you DO have something to offer the anthology.

      Delete
  27. I have to admit that I've definitely cut back on my reading in order to increase my writing time. Possibly a mistake, bu I don't feel I have much choice.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I told myself that only recently. I can vouch it makes a huge difference to your writing when you don't sacrifice your reading time. Sacrifice something else eg TV.

      Delete
  28. Hey Lyn I Quit with the writing, but I used to read books with a baby over my shoulder. Never quit with the reading. That new IWSG book will be great, not that I have anything to offer, LOL!

    (I've been meaning to email for a month or so to apologize for being out of touch while in my cave. I don't come out very often, LOL, but school hols soon! Yippee!)

    Hope things are going well for you. Is that one of your avatars used here?

    Denise :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I understand what it's like to be in a writing cave, so don't feel like you need to apologize for not emailing. I just wish you were still in Brissy!!! lol.

      Re the avatar, do you mean my photo of Stitch? It's one of my husband's many figurines from those video games. They make good photo subjects.

      Delete
  29. I have a tendency to stop and start again whenever anything big changes or shifts, or I get a massive dose of doubt. I don't really fully quit since I keep a journal and lists around. The longest time I went without journaling or writing fiction was about six months, and I remember starting to write some seriously long lists during that time. Reading is like eating for me - I literally can't stand to go more than three days without a book to read. My hardests fasts have been from fiction.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's good you've never really quit, and even better that you are reading a lot.

      Delete
  30. That is a great point about reading. I did that too and does affect the writing when you don't read enough.
    Happy IWSG
    Juneta @ Writer's Gambit

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's amazing the difference it makes.

      Delete
  31. I read to see how others make their stories work, the plotting, the word choice. Of course, it takes me longer to read that way, but I can’t seem to enjoy a story otherwise. I attack movies in the same way. I’m analyzing how the plot sticks together.

    Thanks so much for sharing this with your followers, Lynda. I hope you are well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Victoria. Some of my friends don't like watching movies with me because I'm always pulling the stories and visuals apart, so I understand.

      Delete
  32. I've never quit reading. Even when writing was difficult or unmanageable, I read. It's like filling a dry well. I'm glad you're back writing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It really is like filling a dry well.

      Delete
  33. So true! Getting that level of skill back after even a short pause is difficult. I'm struggling to 'get in the groove' at the moment

    ReplyDelete
  34. I don't really find the skill has faded after a break, but it's like writing is a muscle and I've become unfit. :-D

    So I try not to take breaks. Sometimes, though, I just can't help needing a rest.

    ReplyDelete
  35. As much as I need to write, if I stopped reading to find more time to write, I think I'd start to resent writing. Sometimes I do take breaks from both, but I always do so with every intention to pick the habits back up after a set period of time. I think taking a rest or break is good sometimes.

    ReplyDelete
  36. It was reading that brought me back to writing. I'm just coming off of a long break and you're right when you say that it's rough to regain your previous skill level.

    ReplyDelete
  37. It's exciting to see news of a new anthology. This one will be chalked full of inspiration, I'm sure.

    ReplyDelete

I'd love to hear your opinion. Thanks for leaving a comment.