Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Writing Related Pet Peeves #IWSG



The optional IWSG question for the month: What are your pet peeves when reading/writing/editing?

Pet peeve when reading: When I read, my brain can't shut off from editing and analysing. Sometimes I just want to enjoy a good book and switch off!

Pet peeve when writing: The process of writing a novel is so slow. Why isn't this book finished already!? I could, of course, regurgitate words onto the page, but it still takes time to shape the book into the best it can be.

Pet peeve when editing: Objectifying people. In other words, the confusion over the use of 'who' and 'that' when referring to people. Hint: it should be 'who'.

Bonus peeve when editing: the massive confusion over when to use Lay, Lie, Laid. Sheesh. Look up the rule people!

Deep breath...

Okay, so what are your writing related pet peeves this month? What have you been up to this last month? Got any big plans coming to fruition? Tell me all!

Every first Wednesday of the month the members of the IWSG post on their blogs about their writing insecurities or offer some encouragement to others. If you are new to the IWSG, then please go HERE to find out more and join up.
--





On August 24th at 2:00 pm EST, Chrys Fey will be participating in a LIVE YouTube interview with Evan Carmichael, an entrepreneur who she'll be interviewing about his book Your One Word and getting some great advice for IWSG members. You'll be able to watch the interview live HERE. You can set a reminder if you click on the link, or you can watch it later.The video will be uploaded in the August 30th IWSG newsletter issue.

Pic: I took the above photo of an otter at Australia Zoo.

91 comments:

  1. Hopefully I haven't annoyed you with any of those things. Except maybe my over-slashing of passive and ly words.
    Great otter shot! I otter been there, right?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ly words don't bother me. I think people are too sensitive over the ly words.

      And lol at your otter joke.

      Delete
  2. We shouldn't have to have editing brain while reading published books. It's wrong that it happens :P

    I'm reading a pretty famous and successful book at the moment, and noting things that critiquers have told me not to do in my own writing. Makes me feel all right about where I'm at writing-wise, really. ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep, I think we can over-analyse and become too sensitive over some of the supposed 'rules'.

      Delete
  3. I rarely get hung up in analyzing a book I'm reading, Lynda, unless I want to figure out how an author has done something really well. Usually the words just disappear, and I'm in my imagination when I'm reading ~ lucky I guess! Have a great day visiting everyone!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My problem is that I'm an editor as well as a writer so my critical brain struggles to shut off.

      Delete
  4. Since I have to analyze so many submissions, my brain just doesn't shut off from that mode.

    Love the otter! Oh, wait until you see the next DLP cover. It's an otter. Hopefully it will be up on the site in the next day or two.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm looking forward to seeing the next DLP cover!

      Delete
  5. Oh yes, I wish my blank pages would fill up with words quicker and that I didn't need so many revisions.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wouldn't it be lovely to have a shiny, perfect first draft?

      Delete
  6. I have the same pet peeve when I'm reading. Lately, though, I've taken to audio books so I don't have that problem and I can just sit back and enjoy.

    And yes, the writing process can be terribly slow. Especially when you're a perfectionist. ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, I have that perfectionist problem too. It's something I have to get past. Nothing is perfect.

      Delete
  7. Hee hee, nice peevish post. A lot of the English rules don't matter any more I'm told. You'll see 'that' more than 'who' when referring to people these days...I get sick of asking my students if their character is an animal, LOL. Same with 'which' and 'that'...and a lot of rules we used to think were important. And apparently 'whom' is no longer in the English lexicon.

    Sheesh. Indeed. Go figure. :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, I know about 'that' and 'who' and that 'that' is seen way more often and is accepted more now. It's just one of my personal pet peeves I harbour. I'm pretty easy with the most of the other rules. For example, as I mentioned in the comments above, I really don't care about the ly words. And I'm not a fan of saying 'said' only or not tagging the dialogue at all as a rule. Readers don't care.

      Delete
  8. Yeah, pick up a dictionary or thesaurus and get those words right. Sheesh, lol.

    I procrastinate writing simply because I'm so slow at it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's one of those vicious cycle things: we're slow at writing so we put it off, which makes us even slower.

      Delete
  9. first owls now otters, animals are really not happy to see you, Lynda :)

    ReplyDelete
  10. That is a vicious looking otter. I'm with you about not being able to just enjoy the book when reading, but when I do then I know I've found a fantastic book.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have cute otter shots too, but I chose that particular one for the post.
      And yes!! A sign of a great book is being able to push the inner editor aside.

      Delete
  11. Love the otter pic :-) I really dislike it when my inner editor decides to show up while I'm reading: it's really distracting to have errors pointed out (though it does tend to make me notice these things more in my own writing later).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That inner editor makes us more aware of our own writing, which is great!! But I wish sometimes it had a switch ;)

      Delete
  12. I have similar problems too, especially when reading. But great to return to blogging and read your posts.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I always have to look up that lay, lie, etc rule! It just never seems to stick with me. But at least I'm aware of that so I keep the rule book handy. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Which is the perfect thing to do. Occasionally I have to remind myself too.

      Delete
  14. I love writing my first draft because I don't look up the rules. But I never avoid it in the end. hehehe

    Anna from elements of emaginette

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The first draft is a wonderfully freeing experience full of creativity.

      Delete
  15. I can turn it off most times, unless something is blatant. Thrown or throne for instance. Hate lay, lie and such, try to avoid it lol I know peak, peek and pique is another people screw up, I used peak for pique until recently. Always something to learn.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And the basic typo of though and through. There are so many!

      Delete
  16. We share the who/that pet peeve! Drives me batty :)
    I hate when my writer brain kicks me out of a story too

    ReplyDelete
  17. I hate the lay/lie rule. It really makes NO SENSE with the common flow of English. *sigh* But I digress. It's taken a long time, but I can turn of the editorial function most of the time for reading, and then I just get frustrated about poor character arcs or weak plots.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I totally agree with you re the lay/lie rule, but my hubby gets it wrong on purpose just to see me squirm, lol.

      Oh I get frustrated over that too. I'm kinda jealous you can switch off the inner editor most times. You lucky thing, you.

      Delete
  18. I think someone else mentioned who vs that, something I've definitely guilty of.

    Completely agree with your pet peeve about the writing process being slow. It moves at a sloth-like pace for me, which is very annoying.

    Cheers - Ellen

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Ellen, I must admit occasionally I throw in the wrong one when I'm writing a fast first draft. When I find it, I shake my head at myself.

      Delete
  19. Writing books has made me a perpetual editor. I too find it annoying and wish I could just fall into a story the way I used to.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sometimes I can, but it's usually only with exceptional books that have completely captivated me. It's rare.

      Delete
  20. Hi,
    You know you are so right about a novel writing. If I had known I would still be working on my first novel, I would have never started it. It's a good thing God didn't show me how long it would take.
    Shalom aleichem,
    Patricia at Everything Must Change

    ReplyDelete
  21. Oh, I know!! My internal editor is so annoying, lol. It would turn off either.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Hi Lynda,

    I can so relate. I RARELy enjoy reading these days for that same reason. It THRILLS me when I read a book just for the pleasure of it....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Same. It's a sign of a good book when I can switch off. Unfortunately it's rare. The book I'm currently reading is absolutely wonderful but occasionally even with that one my inner editor wakes up.

      Delete
  23. It does make it harder for me to get into a reading experience, but if I can I don't see the mistakes unless they are glaring. Great post. Juneta @ Writer's Gambit

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Part of my problem is that I'm a slow reader so I have time to pick up on those mistakes. Makes me a good editor, unfortunately.

      Delete
  24. I hear you on the editing peeves. But I think "that" is okay for a large number of people. As in, "a group that liked to knit toy poodles". As for reading, it can be hard to switch off, but the better the story is the more I can get into it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's a rule that's becoming more and more accepted. It's just a personal peeve of mine. I don't like change ;)

      Delete
  25. The who/that thing majorly irritates me as well :) glad to know i'm not the only one

    ReplyDelete
  26. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  27. I think every time I use lay, lie, or laid I have to look it up. It's a mental block I tell ya.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Same. I just want to make sure I do get it right. There is nothing wrong with looking up a grammar rule.

      Delete
  28. Wow! I agree with your pet peeves. I'm always analyzing what I read any more. Which takes longer. I can never just enjoy a book. My husband's forever telling me to just read and not mark up books. And I'm extremely impatient with my writing, painstakingly so. And--yes--people are who. I can't figure out why no one knows that except us. It sure sticks in my computer keys.

    All the best to you, Lynda. Thanks for sharing this with your followers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's part of our blessing/curse as writers. We need to be aware of the rules to be better writers. We need to analyse other books to learn what works and what doesn't.

      Delete
  29. I'm so glad I can read and enjoy a book for the story, how awful to constantly be in the editing mode. But I've met many folks who only read to edit. I read to escape.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I try to read to escape. The best books let me escape in peace.

      Delete
  30. Good peeves. I actually have the lay, lie, laid thing hanging above my desk.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's a good thing to do because I'll admit it's not an easy rule to remember.

      Delete
  31. I have the same problem with reading. And I have been known to re-write entire paragraphs so I don't have to use lie, lay, laid.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You made me smile. In my opinion, avoiding the rule is better than getting that particular rule wrong.

      Delete
  32. We have some of the same pet peeves, and my editor must hate me for lay, lie, and laid! It'll click in my head one of these days.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Just have the rule pasted to your computer ;)

      Delete
  33. You have some great pet peeves. In reading I hate it when authors write characters inconsistently. All the best.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. oh yes! characters need to be consistent

      Delete
  34. While reading, like you, I want to enjoy the book not analyze it or critique it. I want to be drawn into the story and hang on for a great ride.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Exactly! And that joy of reading is what got me into writing in the first place.

      Delete
  35. Hi Lynda - trouble is .. we just note these errors and it's not easy to switch off. Love the otter - is it an it or he or a she??!! or perhaps even a 'who' ... cheers Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The otter is an it because I have no idea if it is male or female. lol.

      Delete
  36. I can relate to your pet peeve while writing. Writing does take a long time. Sometimes I wish I could stay in a more editorial mindset while reading other books. I want to learn from other writers, but once I start reading, I fall into their worlds and forget about how they're using the words. If I want to learn from other books, I have to read it a second time in order to pay attention to what the writer is doing.

    ReplyDelete
  37. I'm the same about how long it takes to complete a novel. Not sure how fast writers do it. They have a skill I haven't acquired.

    ReplyDelete
  38. That is one MEAN lookin' otter! Alas, I relate to the editing while reading too...especially if I know I will be leaving a review for the author. It keeps the Editing Switch to On.

    LOL, I'm the same way about "who" and "that"--and always mark it when I see it. Happy August, Lyn!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have some cuter pics of the otter, but I thought this one was appropriate for the post.

      Happy August to you too.

      Delete
  39. I loved finding out what everyone's pet peeves are when reading, writing, and editing. I can't imagine being an editor because reading would be riddled with errors a lot of the time! I look up rules all the time- even ones I think I have right. :)
    ~Jess

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As an editor, I can confirm that problem. Good to hear you often look up the rules. It's a good habit.

      Delete
  40. I'm the same. I have a hard time with switching off my editing brain when I'm reading. Which means I often have a hard time with concentrating on a story I should be enjoying.

    ReplyDelete
  41. If I feel the editing bug when reading a book for fun, I usually put it down until I stop feeling it, otherwise I'll never enjoy the book:)

    ReplyDelete
  42. Okay, that was funny. I seriously laughed out loud on the peeves. Hilarious.

    ReplyDelete
  43. I have the same problem when I'm reading. Thanks for sharing!


    www.ficklemillennial.com

    ReplyDelete
  44. Poor Lynda. I should feel your pain being a language teacher ha ha but since I'm also a historical sociolinguist (a what?), I know that language changes because people want it to change. Oh dear.... I know. I hope your in-depth knowledge of the mechanics of writing won't stop you enjoying a great book too often. Sometimes the painting is more beautiful than the paint and the techniques involved. You know what I mean.

    P.S. Don't you hate dangling modifiers, as in abused participle clauses? (what?) Wink-wink!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gotta love those danglers ;)
      PS I wasn't going to say anything. I constantly make mistakes even though I should know better.
      And yes, I've seen language change in just the last twenty years, which in the big picture, isn't long.

      Delete
  45. Here's another one... Don't you just hate it when people write, "The big problem is that the art is hit and miss... literally." Literally?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's a joke between my hubby and me. Whenever we hear that one, we turn to each other and say, "Literally!!"

      Delete
  46. I have looked up lay, laid so many times. I NEVER remember. But you are right. I need to look it up again (and again, and again!).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'll admit I often look up the rule to make sure I'm getting it right.

      Delete

I'd love to hear your opinion. Thanks for leaving a comment.